Monday Courses: Registration

N.B.: Course times, dates and locations listed are subject to change. Should this occur it is in order to obtain the best possible classroom space for members. Thank you for your flexibility, understanding and patience.


W20-01 Animals in Archeology NEW

The famous cave paintings in Lasceaux, France, reveal that a close connection between humankind and animals has existed for thousands of years. Initially we hunted them for food, using more and more sophisticated weapons and strategies, but eventually we learned to domesticate them, which enabled us to raise them for food, wool, hides, labour, transportation, and as pets. Some animals became worshipped as gods or represented them, and even today for many in India the cow is a sacred animal not to be slaughtered. In this course, participants will learn about the vital role animals have played in the development of complex societies, how domestication occurred, and the symbolic importance of animals in ancient societies. Within this context we will discuss a variety of animals, important over the millennia to human cultures, including dogs, cats, horses, cattle, camels, llamas, sheep, and bears.
Participants will learn from an expert in the field through a series of illustrated lectures and discussions.

Dr. David Lipovitch (Harvard, ’99) is an archaeologist who has worked with archaeological excavations in southern Ontario, Israel, Jordan, the Republic of Georgia and Turkey. He has been lecturing since the 1990s and is a course instructor in Wilfred Laurier University’s history and archaeology departments, as well as a Research Affiliate at the University of Toronto. He is also the zooarchaeologist at University of Toronto’s excavations at Tell Ta’yinat, Turkey and Gadachrili Gora, Georgia.

Limited to 60 participants


Dates:
Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time:  Mondays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Fee: $95
Location: Chelsea Hotel - Monarch
Instructor:
Dr. David Lipovitch


W20-02 The Legendary Hollywood Film Directors NEW

If you watch TCM, the Turner Classic Movies channel, – or even if you don’t – you’ll know these names: Capra, Hawks, Sturges, Cukor, Wyler, Wilder, Zinnemann, Curtiz, and many more. We’ll talk about their accomplishments, their battles for artistic integrity under the Studio System that reigned in Hollywood from the ‘20s though the ‘50s, the enormous challenges some of these artists faced creating the ‘American Experience’ on film when English was their second, or even third or fourth, language. You’ll experience the good (for instance, the fabulously productive year of 1939) and the no-so-good (the infamous Red Scare witch hunts led by Joe McCarthy). And we’ll acknowledge the women who directed films back in the 1920’s. Enjoy clips of some of the most famous lines in cinema history: “Here’s looking at you, kid;” “Fasten your seat-belts, it’s going to be a bumpy night;” “Well, nobody’s perfect;” “Tomorrow is another day;” “There’s no place like home;” and many others. But most of all, we’ll get to know these brilliant directors, and perhaps even a few whose names you might not recognize, but who have also left us with a great legacy of cinema.

This course will consist of lecture, film clips, and time for questions and answers.

Alan Rosenberg reveres, and has studied, the works of Frank Capra, William Wyler, Billy Wilder, Howard Hawks, Orson Welles, Michael Curtiz, and many others. And he has seen Casablanca 36 times and is shocked – shocked – when he encounters anyone who hasn’t!

Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time: Mondays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Fee: $95
Location: ILLC - International Room
Instructor: Alan Rosenberg



W20-03 Politics, People, and Other Issues

We face many important and challenging issues today, issues that will have far-reaching impact on our lives. We focus in this group on the fundamental questions and key people driving these world events. We welcome opposing views, which make for a stimulating dialogue, carried on in a collegial and respectful manner.

Participants choose the topics for discussion at the beginning of each semester.

This is a discussion class, led by its course leaders.

Jay Waterman has been a member of the class for many years and has served as a Board member of LIFE. He is a Toronto native and retired lawyer.
Lloyd Cadsby is also a retired lawyer who is intrigued by the political and financial issues that dominate our lives. His background in mediation is useful in the give-and-take of class discussion.

Limited to 30 participants
Dates: Jan.27 – Apr.6 (10 sessions, no class Feb. 17)
Time
:  Mondays,
10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Fee: $75
Location: CED303
Instructors: Lloyd Cadsby and Jay Waterman


W20-04 "Trusted like the Fox” – A History of the Tudor Monarchs of England  NEW 

The Tudors governed England ruthlessly and, for the most part, efficiently. Their remarkable political lives and extraordinary personal stories have captured the attention of literature, television, and cinema for years. Writers, directors, and producers have embellished and manipulated this history. This course will set the record straight. Each of the governing Tudors will be analyzed against the tapestry of their times. Their domestic and foreign policies and their dramatic personal lives will be presented from the accession to power of Henry VII to the succession of the Stuart dynasty.

This is a lecture class supported with audio visual presentations which will provide a focus for discussion. There will be a course website to support ideas presented in class and provide additional resources.

John Curtis graduated in English Literature and History and has taught drama and Canadian history with the Toronto District School Board for 30 years. He is currently retired but remains active in various fields of education.

Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time: Mondays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.

Fee: $65
Location: Arts and Letters Club - Great Hall
Instructor: John Curtis


W20-05 Classical Music – It’s Everywhere NEW

Perhaps you began music lessons when you were young and became proficient playing your scales and arpeggios, but then dropped the study of music long ago. Well, come and take another look – this class will open up the world of classical music - and discuss many of those aspects of music that you never thought or dreamed of when you were struggling at the piano or violin. You’ll discover how classical music is woven into and related to our everyday lives. We’ll move from the music of Italy – Bellissimo! – to ballet where we’ll omit the leaps and turns and just listen to the gorgeous music. The music of love and romance will be served next – for mature audiences only! We’ll go on to sail through some great water music and discover how composers used animals and their movement as a source of inspiration. The movie scores that add so much to our film-going experience and the music of Mahler who mirrored his life story in his symphonic work will end our exploration of the world of classical music. No practice required!

The course, taught by an expert in the subject, will include lectures along with extensive video and music recordings.

Howard Mednick has been an avid listener to classical and orchestral music for many years. He has offered many music presentations at Baycrest, in public libraries, and for social groups. His objective is to give you a taste of this great music as you learn more about it.

Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time: Mondays, 12:10 – 1:50 p.m.
Fee
: $95

Location: Arts and Letters Club - Great Hall
Instructor: Howard Mednick


W20-06 Drawing: Freehand Basics II

Freehand drawing is a natural human function. Drawing is not a talent: it is an in-built language, a skill that builds with practice. It is a means of gathering information, germinating ideas, and communicating observations. If you attended Freehand Basics or have the equivalent of beginner drawing, you are well-suited to this course. Come with whatever your level of skill, to pick up wherever you left off.

This is a participatory class and a repeat of a course previously offered at LIFE.

*Please Note: Bring whatever drawing materials you already own. Do not buy any new supplies. A list of required materials will be given out at the first class.

Sue Ericsson has taught Drawing Fundamentals for Ryerson since1974. The City of Toronto Archives owns three of her works.

Limited to 21 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time
: Mondays,
12:10 – 1:50 p.m.
Fee: $95
Location: CED303
Instructor: Sue Ericsson, BFA, SCA


W20-07 Lost Monarchies and Their Lost Treasures NEW

Did the House of Romanov create the House of Fabergé? Was the last Emperor of China really an Empress? The answers to these questions await you in Lost Monarchies and Their Lost Treasures as we meet those powerful European and Asian monarchs who also were great art connoisseurs, and collectors. Beginning with the Stuart Kings, James I and Charles I, we will explore their magnificent art treasures and tour their palaces. After a quick visit to France to view Louis XIV’s fabulous Versailles, we’ll examine several extinct dynasties – the Qing in China, the House of Bourbon in France, and the Russian Romanovs. We will end our treasure hunt with the collection of modern art assembled by the wife of the Shah of Iran but rarely seen since the fall of the Shah.

This will be a lecture course conducted by an expert in the field with extensive visual material, including PowerPoint slides, YouTube clips, and DVD excerpts. There will be some time for Q&A. An extensive reading list will be provided for those interested.


James A.S. Thompson has over ten years’ experience in Continuing Education. He has a Master of Arts degree from Durham University and a diploma in Art History from the Courtauld Institute, London. He obtained his Bachelor of Education degree from OISE/University of Toronto.

Limited to 60 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time: Mondays, 12:10 – 1:50 p.m.
Fee: $95
Location: Chelsea - Monarch
Instructor: James A.S. Thompson


W20-08 The 2020 United States Elections NEW

The upcoming US elections are probably the most consequential in modern times. The surprise election of President Donald Trump in 2016 and the political turmoil that ensued during his first three years of office are making either his re-election, his one-term office, or even his possible impeachment a deciding factor in the future of the world order. The role of the United States and the Western alliance within a liberal democratic world order or the entrenchment of populism and nationalism as the new world order are in the balance. This course will include updates in real time with weekly polls, news, and analysis as the election momentum builds up. Most importantly, it will prepare participants to follow the 2020 US elections with a much greater understanding of the country’s political process and its main constitutional pillars, that is, the separation of powers, federalism, and democratic elections.

This is a lecture course led by an expert in the field.

Amnon Zohar is a retired hi-tech entrepreneur. Born and educated in Israel, he is a graduate of the Israeli Military Academy for Computer Sciences. Amnon studied Political Science at York University and International Relations at Tel-Aviv University. He has offered several courses at LIFE on the Middle East, football (soccer), and leadership.

Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time:  Mondays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m.
Fee: $95
Location: Arts and Letters Club - Great Hall
Instructor:
Amnon Zohar



W20-09 Martin and Lewis: Kings of Comedy and Showbusiness NEW

Before Jim Carrey, before Michael Bublé, before Martin Short, there was Martin & Lewis, one of the greatest musical comedy duos of all time. As the first entertainers to tackle every medium – nightclubs, movies, TV shows, radio, comic books, and more - the unique manic style of Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis ushered in a new era of entertainment that inspired musicals, movies, and comedy acts in the following decades. Explore the humble beginnings of this engaging duo, their long partnership, and the break-up that shook the entertainment world and horrified their fans. Participants will be transported back to the 1940s, travelling forward to the modern day, gaining a deeper understanding of the roots of today's entertainment and comedy. The lives of Martin & Lewis provide a powerful story about friendship, fame, and the American dream.

This is a course presented by an expert in the field and accompanied by numerous slides, and video and audio clips.

Nicholas Arnold
is an international entertainer. He has made a career of paying tribute to the comedy of Jerry Lewis in shows such as A Tribute to Jerry Lewis and the concert Dean and Jerry: What Might Have Been.

Limited to 60 participants


Dates:
Jan.27 – Mar.16 (7 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time:  Mondays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m.
Fee:  $85
Location: VIC203
Instructor: Nicholas Arnold



W20-10 A Walk into the World: Great Writers of Great Walks NEW

Take a walk through the world with some of the world's great travel writers who have explored it on foot. From Rebecca Solnit's quirky history of walking, Wanderlust, to the experiences of Bill Bryson along the Appalachian Trail, Eric Newby in the Hindu Kush and Patrick Leigh Fermor in Mitteleuropa, you'll have a chance to see how different things are when you're experiencing the world on foot. Writers like Robert Macfarlane and Olivia Laing explore how differently we talk about landscape when we're closer to the ground while Lauren Elkin shows us how distinctly women walk through cities. And we'll even have a chance to see Toronto through new eyes, when we take a psycho-geographic stroll through the city with writer Shawn Micallef!

This is a lecture course, taught by an expert, with opportunity for discussion. A list of suggested readings will be made available, which will enrich your enjoyment of the classes, but they are not required reading.

Jeffrey Canton has lectured on great travel writers, contemporary essayists, the memoir and the novella at the LIFE Institute at Ryerson as well as at the Baycrest Learning Academy.  He was for many years a lecturer in the Children’s Studies program at York University.  He’s also a writer and performer and has appeared as part of the Toronto Storytelling Festival, Myseum Intersections, Nuit Rose and the Hamilton Fringe Festival. He is the 2019 winner of Storytelling Toronto's Alice Kane Award and is currently the Children's Book columnist for The Globe and Mail.

Limited to 60 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time:  Mondays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m.
Fee: $95
Location:
Chelsea - Monarch
Instructor: Jeffrey Canton



W20-11 Discussion de films francophones XIII

Here's the course for those of you who wish to practise and improve your French skills in a relaxed cultural context. Shared subject matter for discussion is provided by viewing consecutive segments of films with English or French  subtitles, followed by class discussion to analyze and discuss their historical, cultural, and social elements. The necessary vocabulary will be provided for each film so that you can participate in the conversation and exchange of ideas. As always, the films selected for this course are new to continuing participants. It is open both to new members and to those who have already taken the previous courses.

This course follows previous courses, Discussion de films francophones I to XII, and does require a solid background in French.

Dr. Françoise Mugnier taught French language, culture, and civilization courses at the University of Toronto for 40 years and has been teaching this course on francophone films with the LIFE Institute for the last several years.

Limited to 25 participants

Dates: Jan.27 – Mar.23 (8 sessions, no class Feb.17)
Time: Mondays, 4:10  – 5:50 p.m.
Fee: $65

Location: CED303
Instructor
: Françoise Mugnier



Accessibility: The LIFE Institute is committed to accessibility for persons with disabilities. Please contact the office 2 weeks in advance of the first class if you have any particular accommodation requirements.