Wednesday Courses: Registration

N.B.: Due to class-size based on registration, room locations may change.


F34 High Park Nature: Discover What’s on Your Doorstep! NEW


Join us to learn about the unique flora and fascinating fauna that call High Park home, including butterflies, birds, trees, and wildflowers. We will hike through High Park’s natural ecosystems, including the globally endangered black oak savannah, wetlands, and woodlands to better understand this vital urban green space. A series of four 90-minute walks in High Park will be guided by an experienced naturalist.

This is an outdoor activity which will take place rain or shine so please dress for the weather.


Emily Beaton
is a naturalist teacher and the Adult Programs Coordinator at the High Park Nature Centre. She studied biology at Mount Allison University and the history of science at the University of Toronto, and combines these interests with her love of interpretation. She has worked as an interpreter at Vimy Ridge and Rideau Hall, and as an outdoor educator at Evergreen Brick Works. Emily enjoys helping students build a greater relationship with the natural world through outdoor games, interactive hikes, and other environmental education activities.

Limited to 20 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Nov. 6 (4 sessions)
Time:
Wednesdays, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.*

Location: High Park
Fee:
$60
Instructor:
Emily Beaton

*Please note starting and ending times





F35 International Comedy Films NEW

This course addresses the place of English language humour in the wider world of different cultures and languages. English humour contains a gold mine of material, and its brilliance is legendary. This course will offer some perspective on that famous legend. We’ll see that laughter is indeed universal as so many aspects of comedy transcend language. We’ll enjoy and appreciate the power of laughter as we discover in film its wide-ranging attraction for people everywhere. In addition to British, American, and Canadian film, the course will touch on European and non-European language film comedies, including Bollywood, the Nordic countries, China, and other Far East communities.
This is a lecture course taught by an expert in the field with opportunities for questions and discussion.

Jack Newman
has been an award-winning actor and writer in Toronto for 45 years, appearing in the very first Stephen Leacock Humour festival in 1973. As a union representative for ACTRA (Association of Radio and Television Artists), he has been involved with every aspect of the Canadian entertainment business – from political activism to stage acting. He has lectured on comedy subjects at community centres and LIFE Institute for over four years.
Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Oct. 16 - Dec. 4 (8 sessions)
Time
:
Wednesdays, 12:10 – 1:50 p.m. PLEASE NOTE TIME CHANGE
Location:
Burgundy Room, Memorial Hall, North York Civic Centre
*
Please Note: this course will be held at the North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge Street.

Fee:
$95
Instructor:
Jack Newman




F36 Photo Composition

Over time, photographers have developed some general principles about what makes a good photograph. Learning to use these can help avoid the disappointment we sometimes feel when the results do not match what we intend to capture when we push the shutter button. We will discuss and practise some of these ideas, including camera orientation, zooming, placement, balance, depth of field, and other composition elements. The course is intended for those who have a good working knowledge of the fundamentals of photography, e.g., camera operation and exposure. You must have a camera/tablet/phone to use in class and homework assignments. Learners will get the most out of the course if they have time to work on assignments between classes and submit some of their photos for review in class.
This is an active participation class with guidance from experienced photographers.

Harold Hutner, Nan Weiner, and Edward Zamble
are avid photographers who enjoy helping others improve their skills to produce beautiful and meaningful images.
Limited to 12 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Nov. 27 (6 sessions, no class Oct. 23)
Time:
Wednesdays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Fee:
$55
Location:
VIC607A
Instructors: Harold Hutner, Nan Weiner and Edward Zamble





F37 The Problem of Finite Resources NEW

This course offers you a short foray into Industrial Engineering, with a display and examples of a few of the tools available and how these tools may be used to solve the problem of finite resources. It does not ask for more than knowledge of high school arithmetic and relies more on plain logic. Most problems are really simple if you know how to reduce them to the most rudimentary and basic level. This, by the way, is one of the tools – Pareto analysis. As we view these tools, we may catch a glimpse of how some of them, in raw form or modified, may apply to new situations. For example, a vast chunk of current and future packaging waste can be eliminated through more thoughtful design. Thus, the intent of the course is to expose participants to a different array of methodologies, of a kind that many of us have never encountered, and to raise awareness of how differently problems can be approached and solved.
Participants will learn from an expert in the field through a series of illustrated lectures.

Leo Greenberg
, P. Eng. Holds a B.Sc. from the Technion in Industrial Engineering and a MSc in the same field. He practiced as an engineering manager, sales manager, and as a tech services manager before retiring at 55. His projects were primarily in the US, Chile, Brazil, Germany, and Canada. He also lectured extensively to students, vocational schools, and army officers in training.

Limited to 40 participants

Dates:
Oct. 2 – Nov. 27 (8 sessions, no class Oct. 9)
Time:
Wednesdays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Location:
Oakham House, Riel Room
Fee:
$95
Instructor:
Leo Greenberg



F38 Social Media in the Age of Populism NEW

We have witnessed the rise of Neo-Nazism and anti-Semitism in Europe, the problems caused by Brexit in the UK, and the election of Donald Trump in the US. In the age of social media and fake news aimed at influencing the course of such events, it is essential for us to understand the relationship between media, communication, and power. This course will present you with a range of topics in these areas which are key to understanding the current political climate – from who gets to speak, to which voices are silenced, to the rise of fake news, and issues of privacy and surveillance. We will also explore how the rise of populism, particularly in the Western democracies, is related to various media and communication strategies aimed at shaping public opinion.
Participants will learn from an expert in the field through a series of illustrated lectures.
Maral Karimi
is a PhD student in the Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto. She is the author of The Iranian Green Movement of 2009: Reverberating Echoes of Resistance, released in August 2018.
Limited to 70 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Dec. 4 (8 sessions)
Time:
Wednesdays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Location:
Textile Museum, Auditorium
Fee:
$95
Instructor:
Maral Karimi





F39 TED Talks: Where Technology, Entertainment, and Design Converge NEW

TED is a nonprofit media organization devoted to spreading ideas worldwide by posting short talks of 20 minutes or less online for free distribution. It began in 1984 as a conference with an original focus on the convergence of technology, entertainment, and design, and today covers almost all topics – from science to business to global issues. The topics to be presented and discussed in this course will include, but are not limited to: AI/Robotics, academic research, gene/DNA editing, brain research, health-related innovations, and the opioid/drug crisis. For those who may have taken this course before, some of the topics will be similar, but the videos will be different as will the participants’ discussion, of course.
Videos will be viewed and interactive group participation is expected/desired after each topic. While on-line access is preferable, and links to the videos will be sent to participants prior to each session, it is not mandatory as each video will be shown in class.

Wayne Marigold
is a retired pharmacist who spent much of his career in senior positions in a number of hospitals, most recently The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He has been a LIFE member for several years and currently is one of the coordinators for the Photography Club.
Limited to 40 participants

Dates:
Oct. 2 – Nov. 27 (8 sessions, no class Oct. 9)
Time:
Wednesdays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Location:
Bond Place Hotel
Fee:
$65
Instructor:
Wayne Marigold





F40 Book Talk

Come and join the discussion about books in this lively, thought-provoking group where we explore, debate, and enjoy an assortment of contemporary novels and biographies. You will be notified of the first book once you have enrolled in the course. Books for the remaining classes will be decided by the group at the first meeting and presented by members at each subsequent meeting. Participants are encouraged to bring their own book suggestions.
This class involves participant presentations and lively discussion.

Deborah Wingate, Patricia O’Sullivan,
and Lindy Small are pleased to moderate this long-standing group for LIFE. Deborah and Patricia are retired librarians and Lindy is a retired educator. They enjoy books of all types and have been avid readers since childhood.
Limited to 16 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16, 30 and Nov. 13, 27 (4 sessions)
Time:
Wednesdays, 12:10 – 1:50 p.m.
Location:
VIC607A and CED303
Fee:
$45
Instructors:
Lindy Small, Deborah Wingate and Patricia O’Sullivan





F41 An Introduction to Philosophy: Exploring and Going Deeper – From Plato to Piaget NEW

The completion of a course offered previously, “An Introduction to Philosophy: From Socrates to Sartre,” is NOT required in order to take this course and enjoy the NEW topics we will explore!
“The feeling of wonder is the mark of the philosopher, for all philosophy has its origin in wonder” (Plato). Have you ever wanted to take an introductory course in philosophy but felt intimidated? This course introduces and makes accessible the ideas of both classical and contemporary philosophers as they tackle the “Big” questions in philosophy and our life on this planet: What is Being? What is Belief? What is the mind/body problem? What is the new conversation about the universe and consciousness? Are we really free? We will continue to examine and explore a number of intriguing philosophical paradoxes. Critical thinking and questions will be an integral part of this course.

A lecture series with clear PowerPoint notes, video clips, and some discussion presented by an expert in the field.

Marianne Loranger
holds a doctorate in the field of education and philosophy with additional degrees in science and theology. She has held academic positions at the University of Toronto, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, and at Niagara University. She has previously taught other philosophy courses at LIFE.
Limited to 50 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 - Nov. 27 (7 sessions)
Time:
Wednesdays, 12:10 – 1:50 p.m.
Location:
Chelsea Hotel, Monarch Room
Fee:
$85
Instructor:
Marianne Loranger





F42 Particular History of Terrorism NEW

“The War on Terror” has become a hallmark of the contemporary international order. 9/11, Al Qaeda, and ISIS/ISIL have become terms in the common vernacular. But is it all really anything new? Contrary to popular belief, terrorism and terror have always been part of the international polity. From the terror cimbricus of ancient Rome to Osama Bin Laden, world history is littered with “terrorists.” While we have used the word for more than two millennia, defining terrorism in any objective and universally agreed fashion has proven difficult. This course will explore some of the many dimensions of global terrorism, tracing the development of terrorism as a political tool from the ancient world to the 21st century.
This is a lecture series taught by an expert in the field of study.

Peter Vronsky
is a Canadian author, filmmaker, investigative historian, and a professor at Ryerson University where he teaches the history of international relations, espionage, war crimes, genocide warfare and terrorism. He holds a PhD in criminal justice history and espionage in international relations from the University of Toronto. He is the author of three bestseller histories of serial killers, including the recently published Sons of Cain: A History of Serial Killers from the Stone Age to the Present.

Limited to 40 participants
Dates:
Oct. 2 – Dec. 4 (8 sessions; no classes Oct. 9 and 16)
Time:
Wednesdays, 12:10 – 1:50 p.m.
Location:
Oakham House, Riel Room
Fee:
$95
Instructor
: Peter Vronsky




F43 Resilient Living NEW

Resilience is not about bouncing back, but rather bouncing forward. Employing proper tools and practices is important, as well as recognizing that we can be the heroes in our lives. We can honor our suffering and respect our needs for self-care as we shape each day toward a more inspiring future. The study of resilience is not only about navigating present challenges, but also reflecting on past experience to prepare us for missteps and unexpected situations. It is about leveraging the good within us during easier times so that we move closer to a sense of thriving right now. We will look at the hidden power of everyday positive experiences, connection and meaningful support, fixed/growth mindset, transforming stressful moments into opportunity, character strengths, the ideal resilient self. We will examine the research on the importance of positive emotions, mindfulness, meditation, and exercise. You will be given practical, easy-to-use strategies in which lie the possibilities for finding meaning, purpose, and a life of well-being.
Although some material will be presented in lecture format, this class is essentially an interactive workshop. Be prepared to participate in large and small group discussions.

Lillian Mills,
B.S., M. Ed., B.C.C., is a former special education teacher and now a professional life coach, helping her local and international clients to attain their personal and professional goals.
Limited to 16 participants

Dates:
Oct. 2 – 30 (4 sessions; no class Oct. 9)
Time:
Wednesdays, 12:10 –1:50 p.m.
Location:
CED303
Fee:
$45
Instructor:
Lillian Mills





F44 Seeing Theatre: The Visual Aspects of Productions

We say that we go “to SEE a play.” But do we, as audience members, have a full understanding of how the visual enhances (or sometimes confuses) our appreciation of the play, musical, or opera we are attending? This course will discuss and illustrate the various visual elements that directors and designers employ to influence the audience/spectators’ reaction to a work. The discussions will include the theatre space, the audience/performer relationship, and details of scenic, costume, and lighting design. Class participants will gain a new insight into theatrical products and never view them the same way again.
This is a lecture course by an expert in the field with opportunity for questions and discussion. Please note that this course was offered in a previous term at LIFE.

Phillip Silver's
50-year stage design career includes close to 300 productions at major theatres across Canada, including Stratford Festival and Toronto's Canadian Stage and Tarragon Theatre. He taught design at York University, where he also served as Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts.
Limited to 100 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Dec. 4 (8 sessions)
Time:
Wednesdays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m. PLEASE NOTE TIME CHANGE
Location:
Burgundy Room, Memorial Hall, North York Civic Centre
*Please Note: this course will be held at the North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge Street.
Fee: $95
Instructor:
Phillip Silver





F45 Sorting Out Your Photographs: An Introduction

You now have many photos stored in your camera … what comes next? This course will teach you how to get photos from your camera to your computer and how to name and organize them. You will also learn how to e-mail photos and search for photos that have previously been filed.
This is an interactive class led by an experienced instructor.
Prerequisite:
For PC users with a working knowledge of computer basics.
Nan Weiner is an avid camera enthusiast who enjoys helping people learn how to keep their photos organized and accessible!
Limited to 10 participants

Date:
Nov. 13 (1 session)
Time: Wednesday, 12:10 –1:50 p.m.
Location:
VIC607A
Fee: $25
Instructor
: Nan Weiner




F46 California Dreamin’ NEW

From Neil Sedaka and Chubby Checker, to the Doors and the Jimi Hendrix Experience – no other decade of the 20th century produced such a quantum leap in the range and quality of its music as did the 1960’s. California Dreamin’ will explore all of this fabulous music and the events that brought it to life, most notably the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. Each session will include an eclectic wealth of musical selections all pumped out through a very good sound system – from the dance crazes, the girl groups, surf music, doo-wop, Motown and the Phil Spector Wall of Sound, to the Beatles and the British Invasion, culminating in the explosion of great new sounds from the Woodstock era. Come and re-visit an amazing decade of music that sounds even better now than it did more than half a century ago.
This course is a series of illustrated lectures utilizing extensive video and music recordings.

Tom Plewman
graduated with a BA in History from the University of Western Ontario. For thirty years he owned and operated the Madrigal Classical Record Shop in London, Ontario, then in Halifax. He has a 25-year background in radio and over 35 years of experience giving talks on great composers for various church groups, retirement homes, and classes.
Limited to 100 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Dec. 4 (8 sessions)
Time: Wednesdays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m.
Location: Burgundy Room, Memorial Hall, North York Civic Centre
*Please Note: this course will be held at the North York Civic Centre, 5100 Yonge Street.

Fee:
$95
Instructor:
Tom Plewman




F47 Cold Cases NEW

In this course we will investigate some of the grisliest murders that have baffled law enforcement and terrified communities from around the world. We will examine these cases from the perspective of law enforcement and explore how evolving technologies like fingerprinting, forensics, DNA, and psychological profiling have been instrumental in bringing killers to justice. Our survey will end by exploring some of the controversial theories in abnormal psychology and sociology which try to determine what combination of nature and nurture goes into the creation of such criminals. Included in this nefarious company will be Jack the Ripper, Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer, and more.
This is a lecture course.

Paul Diaz
has an MA in History and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Education, and has taught history, civics, and literature at a senior level. His main areas of interest are history and psychology, although before teaching he also trained in criminology. Paul enjoys working with students of all ages and believes that spreading a passion for learning is not merely a job – but a genuine vocational calling.
Limited to 40 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Dec. 4 (8 sessions)
Time: Wednesdays, 2:10 - 3:50 p.m.
Fee:
$95
Location:
Bond Place Hotel
Instructor:
Paul Diaz





F48 Feast Your Eyes on This: Exploring Toronto’s Evolving Food Cultures, Part 5 NEW


If you love meeting and engaging with Toronto’s eclectic food entrepreneurs, this course is for you. In the previous four courses, we have welcomed CBC Radio food writer Suresh Doss, Zimbabwe meat pie expert Evis Chirowa, Mary Freij of Ryerson campus’s Mazeh Catering, and Alon Ozery of Parallel Brothers and Ozery Bakery. We don’t just sample food. We learn what motivates our guests, share some of their family stories, and learn about some of their early food memories. We will make onsite visits, when possible. This course aims at forging meaningful connections between the food entrepreneurs and you.
Like the previous four courses there will be short talks, food tastings, and possibly tours. Extra costs for these visits will be minimal and will be reviewed in class. It is not necessary to have participated in the previous courses to participate in Part 5.

Rosalin Krieger earned a master’s degree at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, and is a global lecturer, education consultant, literary advisor, editor, writer and visual artist based in Toronto. She is an award-winning broadcaster, a member of Canadian Women in Food, and an intrepid food consultant-enthusiast. She hosts social-historical food tours in North Toronto, Markham, Thornhill, and Richmond Hill.
Limited to 35 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Nov. 20 (6 sessions)
Time:
Wednesdays, 2:10 - 3:50 p.m.

Fee:
$78
(additional costs for on-site visits to be discussed in class)
Location:
CED303

Instructor:
Rosalin Krieger




F49 Getting Out: Exploring Toronto’s Cultural Neighbourhoods (WED)

Public spaces, art galleries, cafes and eateries and independent, design-inflected boutiques are bellwethers of Toronto’s evolution. Over the course of one lecture and seven outings, we’ll go off the beaten track to the Sandra Ainsley Gallery and a west-end artist-owned gallery/private collection. Also, there’s a Street Art walk in DuWest and outings to Dupont and Miller, Harbourfront, the Junction, and more. Newcomers and returnees will see key exhibitions, meet gallerists and creatives, and discover great places to eat, drink, and support local entrepreneurs.
Our sole on-campus session is an illustrated “2019 Fall Arts Highlights” talk. Each week detailed itineraries will be provided, and we’ll end with an optional coffee break.

This is an interactive, hands-on course. Itineraries will be e-mailed to participants in advance of each session.

Betty Ann Jordan
is an arts writer, commentator, and cultural tour maven. Trained as an artist, she also gives talks on art appreciation. Betty Ann is the founder of Art InSite tours, offering custom cultural walking tours in Toronto.
Limited to 40 participants

Dates:
Oct. 2 – Nov. 27 (8 sessions, no class Oct. 9)
Time:
Wednesdays, 1 – 3 p.m.*
Location: Participants will be advised of each week’s meeting point by e-mail prior to the session
Fee:
$95

Instructor:
Betty Ann Jordan
*Please note start time
and end times
This course also is offered on Fridays 1-3 p.m.
   Please register for one session only.





F50 History of the American Civil War NEW

The Civil War (1861-1865) is probably the most catastrophic event in United States history, killing two percent of the American population during its four-year period. While it is popularly portrayed as a war to abolish slavery, its causes are much more complicated and multi-faceted. This course looks at the nature of the slave-trading “industry” in the New World, its place in the Thirteen Colonies of the British Empire, its transformation after the 1776 American Revolution, and the emergence of a civil war between Free Labour States of the industrial north and so-called Capital States of the agrarian slave south.
Participants will learn from an expert in the field through a series of illustrated lectures.
Peter Vronsky
is a Canadian author, filmmaker, investigative historian, and a professor at Ryerson University where he teaches the history of international relations, espionage, war crimes, genocide warfare, and terrorism. He holds a PhD in criminal justice history and espionage in international relations from the University of Toronto. He is the author of three bestselling histories on serial killers, including the recently published Sons of Cain: A History of Serial Killers from the Stone Age to the Present.
Limited to 40 participants

Dates: Oct. 2 – Dec. 4 (8 sessions, no classes Oct. 9, 16)
Time:
Wednesdays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m.
Location:
Oakham House, Riel Room
Fee:
$95
Instructor:
Peter Vronsky





F51 Hyper-reality and Virtual Worlds: The Philosophy of a Digital Age NEW

As digital technology advances, our fundamental understanding of what it is to be human changes. Virtual artists can produce paintings that rival the work of human masters. Virtual composers can create symphonies. Video games and game worlds are creating entirely new communities. Human beings are being replaced by robots for increasingly complex tasks. People are connected digitally, leading to such revolutions as the Arab Spring in the Near East and to election tampering in the US and Canada. Digital technology creates wearable devices which monitor our health, our purchases, our ideas, and our location. This is digital “culture shock.” Is it going to make our lives better or worse? What is digital detoxification, the movement away from high-tech spirituality? The future is exploding with change, and this course will help you make sense of it from a philosophical and scientific perspective.
Participants will learn from an expert in the subject in a series of illustrated lectures.

David Chandross
, BSc, MSc, MEd, PhD is currently a professor in residence at Humber College where he leads initiatives in simulations and serious game development. He is a two-time award-winning game designer who collaborates with numerous organizations to improve learning. Clients include the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Elections Canada, the Canadian Armed Forces, the Senior Executive of the Chang School at Ryerson, Baycrest Health Sciences and the College of Family Physicians, Ontario.
Limited to 50 participants

Dates:
Oct. 16 – Dec. 4 (8 sessions)
 Time: Wednesdays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m.
Location:
Chelsea Hotel, Monarch Room
Fee:
$95
Instructor:
David Chandross



F52 Theatre Alive!

Wednesday, September 25, 1 p.m.
Marilyn and Charles Baillie Theatre (formerly Berkeley Street Theatre)

26 Berkeley Street (Front and Parliament area)
A Volcano Theatre production presented by Canadian Stage.
A World Premiere to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide.
The Book of Life

Written and performed by Odile Gakire Katese

Odile Gakire (Kiki) Katese, director, author, and humanitarian, has been honoured around the world for her use of art to heal and inspire. In this groundbreaking collaboration with Ross Manson, one of Canada’s most celebrated directors, Katese takes the audience on a remarkable journey of resilience and imagination. At a time when our world is racked with disharmonies, hatreds, and struggle, The Book of Life offers hope, unlocking trauma and finding a way forward, full of joy.

“Volcano is one of those companies that every great theatre city needs – bold, experimental, and bubbling with ideas.” The Toronto Star

Wednesday, October 16, 1:30 p.m.
Tarragon Theatre
30 Bridgman Avenue (Dupont and Bathurst area)
Yaga

Written and directed by Kat Sandler

“Bad children are the softest, and easiest to eat, but a bad man’s bones hold power, power tastes like salt, and we love salt more than anything.”

From the mind that brought you Mustard, a genre-bending fairy tale meets whodunit, inspired by the notorious figure of Baba Yaga, the hideous old witch who lives alone in the woods grinding the bones of the wicked. A gruesome murder in a small town leads the local sheriff, a young detective and a university professor with a taste for younger men into a labyrinth of secret lives, ancient magic and multiple suspects.

A play that gives voice to the wicked old witch, Yaga is part thriller, part revenge play and lots of comedy.

Wednesday, October 30, 1:30 p.m.

Tarragon Theatre
30 Bridgman Avenue (Dupont and Bathurst area)

The Jungle

Written by Anthony McMahon and Thomas McKechnie

I worked ‘till I was ready to die. I made it. I belong here. I have carved myself into this country.”

She’s from Moldova, he’s the son of Chinese immigrants. She’s a factory worker by day and a waitress by night. He’s a cab driver. One night he picks her up running from job to job and their whirlwind romance begins. This is a typical Toronto love story, stolen in the moments between shifts. But can their love survive a city in late capitalism

Wednesday, November 20, 1:30 p.m.

Tarragon Theatre
30 Bridgman Avenue (Dupont and Bathurst area)

Copy That

Written by Jason Sherman

“So, what people watch on TV, it’s got nothing to do with the real world?”

Renowned playwright Jason Sherman’s caustic look at the entertainment industry, Copy That takes us behind the scenes of network television. Four writers struggle to get their new cop show approved for production. When the team’s only black writer is roughed up by an actual cop, the fallout threatens to not only kill the show but also expose the systemic racism at the heart of popular entertainment itself.

From the author of last season’s moving account of the life of Marshall McLuhan (The Message)

Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Sept. 25, Oct. 16 and 30, Nov. 20
Time:
Wednesday afternoon (see times above) *
Fee:
$95
Coordinator:
Rayna Jolley, assisted by Sharon Stibbard

There will be a talkback after every performance.

Tickets for all performances will be given to you at the theatre before the first play.
They will not be mailed to you.

A reminder will be sent by e-mail before each performance.

Please Note: No exchange or refund will be given after the final ticket order has been placed. Please address any concerns or complaints to the LIFE office and not to the theatre.

*Important: Please be aware of the start times of each performance as some theatres do not allow latecomer seating.


Theatre Web Sites:

canadianstage.com

volcano.ca

tarragontheatre.com

 


Accessibility: The LIFE Institute is committed to accessibility for persons with disabilities. Please contact the office 2 weeks in advance of the first class if you have any particular accommodation requirements.