Friday Courses: Registration

N.B.: Course times, dates and locations listed are subject to change. Should this occur it is in order to obtain the best possible classroom space for members. Thank you for your flexibility, understanding and patience.

W20-46 The Arctic: Life on the Top of the World

The global Arctic is comprised of eight nations: Canada, the Kingdom of Denmark (Greenland & The Faroe Islands), Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Russia, and the US. And while these nations represent millions of people, very few of their populations actually live in the Arctic, and even fewer have ever visited. This course examines the beauty, mystery, and dangers of today’s Arctic: the impacts of climate change, environmental transformations, geopolitical land claims, the Northwest Passage, the flora and fauna, and the people who live there. Film screenings will supplement lectures to demystify this beautiful and unusual part of our world.

This is a lecture course accompanied by slides, film clips, and videos, with time for class discussion.

Please note: this class has been previously offered at LIFE.

Mark Terry is a course director and teacher at York University. He has travelled throughout the global Arctic on several occasions, documenting the research of ArcticNet (2010), serving as the Scientist-in-Residence on Adventure Canada’s circumnavigation of Iceland (2018), and making the first documented video of a crossing of the Northwest Passage, The Polar Explorer (2011). Mark has given classes in Arctic documentary filmmaking for the American Conservation Society and at the Arctic College of the Peoples of the North in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Jan.31 – Mar.20 (8 sessions)
Time:  Fridays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Fee: $95
Location: ILLC - International Room
Instructor
: Dr. Mark Terry


W20-47 The Economist Seminar

Our stimulating discussions are based on articles from this prestigious and influential magazine. The topics dealt with are broad in scope: issues relating to nations, the economy, the arts, science, and the people influencing these concerns. We will focus on specific articles that the class members have been directed to and discuss the challenging issues that are raised in those articles. Join us in a lively and respectful exchange of views.

Please Note: Class members will be able to subscribe to The Economist at a considerably reduced annual rate.

This is a discussion class, led by the course leaders.

Lloyd Cadsby and Jay Waterman are both retired lawyers who have found there is LIFE after law by pursuing their interest in world events.

Limited to 30 participants

Dates: Jan.31 – Apr.3 (10 sessions)
Time:  Fridays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.

Fee: $75

Location:
KHE323
Instructors
: Lloyd Cadsby and Jay Waterman


W20-48 The Meaning of Cinema: More Than Just Entertainment NEW

While movies are loved by many for their sheer entertainment value, cinema has often been seen as a threat by governments, a rallying cause for activists, and emblematic of something deeper than just mere storytelling. Whether it be the liberal films of Weimar Germany or the freewheeling late 20s and early 30s American cinema, movies have often been seen as damaging to a nation’s moral fabric.  Other times, specific films, The Rules of the Game, The Battle of Algiers, have upset the powers that be or inspired people around the world to rise up against injustice. This course will examine those key movies and filmmakers who made a difference in our cultural consciousness. 

Shlomo Schwartzberg has been an arts reporter, film critic, and programmer for over 30 years. He is the former chair of the Toronto Jewish Film Society and a co-founder of and regular contributor to the Critics at Large website. (http://www.criticsatlarge.ca/).

Limited to 60 participants

Dates: Jan.31 – Mar.20 (8 sessions)
Time: Fridays, 10:10 – 11:50 a.m.
Fee: $95
Location
: VIC200
Instructor
: Shlomo Schwartzberg


W20-50 The Art of the Hollywood Musical

The Golden Age of Hollywood is a category of cinema occurring between the late 1920s and the early 1960s. During this time a particular genre flourished – the musical. Usually themed around romance, the musical was often light-hearted and provided many with a much-needed escape from the horrors of World War II. But the genre was unique in another less-studied way. It provided visual artists an opportunity to create some of the most breathtaking scenes in cinema history: the “wedding cake” dance numbers of Busby Berkeley (1930s); Vincent Minnelli’s surreal stage productions of An American in Paris (1951); the reality-bending set pieces of George Cukor’s A Star is Born (1954). And these are just some of the examples of the artistic experimentation in the Hollywood musical that this course will present and explore.

This is a lecture course accompanied by slides, film clips, and videos, with time for class discussion.

Please note: This course was offered in the LIFE 2019 summer session.

Mark Terry is a postdoctoral fellow, course director, and professor at York University. He has had a long career as a filmmaker, working primarily in documentary, but also spending five years in Hollywood working in the studio system (1993 to 1998). Before this, Dr. Terry owned and operated Torontos Bayview Playhouse theatre, staging such popular musicals as The World Goes ‘Round and Nunsense. His theatre productions outside of Toronto include the first Canadian production of a Fringe play mounted on Broadway: Caged (1991), and a five-year run of The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: An Evening with Charles Dickens in Londons West End. Today, Dr. Terry sits on the Board of Directors of two theatre companies: the Beech Street Theatre Company (Whitby) and the Bygone Theatre Company (Toronto).

Limited to 100 participants

Dates: Jan.31 - Mar.20 (8 sessions)
Time: Fridays, 12:10 – 1: 50 p.m.
Fee: $95
Location: ILLC - International Room
Instructor: Dr. Mark Terry


W20-51 Leaving a Legacy: Your Life Story

You don’t have to be famous to have an interesting life story that deserves to be told and that will be treasured as a one-of-a-kind legacy by those you love today and by heirs you will never meet. In bygone days, this happened naturally because handwritten letters were passed from generation to generation. But today’s communications are usually by phone, email and text, resulting in too few personal archives being preserved. This course, which evolved from LIFE’s long-running Recording Recollections, will help you create your life story by breaking the mammoth process into small chunks of memories. This is a participatory class. You will be expected to write a new 500 – 1,400-word memoir to read aloud each week. For those who would like to produce a complete autobiography, you will weave your individual pieces together outside of class. This is not an instructional class as the time is spent listening to and commenting positively on each of the memoirs presented. Before the semester begins, you will be sent a comprehensive “starter” package. And there is a valuable after-class opportunity (at the nearby Oakham Cafe) to chat with your fellow memoirists about the projects we are all working on. 

This is an interactive course involving participant participation and interaction.

Tamara Handler is a former schoolteacher and an accomplished and enthusiastic memoirist.

Martha Olynyk has been a long-time avid participant in Recording Recollections and Leaving a Legacy.

Limited to 12 participants

Dates: Jan.31 – Apr.3 (10 sessions)
Time: Fridays, 12:10 –1:50 p.m.
Fee: $75
Location: SHE540
Instructors
: Tamara Handler and Martha Olynyk


W20-52 The Road to Brexit: British Politics, Culture and Society, 1945 to Present Day NEW

The Brexit vote of 2016 came as a major shock to the political classes at Westminster and the main political parties, most of whose members basically supported a continuation of Britain’s membership in the European Union (EU). The prospective exit of Britain from the EU represents a seismic shift in British politics and is perhaps a template for further secessions by other member-states. Yet, in seeking to explain Brexit, it is useful to examine the extent to which Britain has historically ever been committed to the EU. The formidable legacy of the British Empire forged a separate political culture and identity from that of mainland Europe: the commitment to Europe has always been controversial. This course examines British politics and society in historical context to help analyze why the Brexit vote occurred. We will consider long- and short-term factors, from the “Little England” emphasis on national independence, to the complexities of changing demographics and mass immigration. We will consider successive governments, institutions, political parties, prominent individuals, and the wider society to shed light on the nature of Britain’s relationship with Europe and the world. We will also examine popular culture as a means of discerning underlying and deep-seated attitudes towards Europe and the world.

This is a lecture series taught by an expert in the field.

Dr. Gordon Bannerman received his Ph.D. from King’s College London in 2005 and has an extensive publication record of books, articles, and reviews. He was admitted as a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in 2015 for his contribution to historical scholarship. Dr. Bannerman has taught British history at the London School of Economics, Dundee University, and King’s College London. He currently teaches The History of Business and Government and Business at the University of Guelph-Humber, Ontario.

Limited to 60 participants

Dates: Jan. 31 – Mar. 20 (8 sessions)
Time: Fridays, 12:10 – 1:50 p.m.
Fee: $95 
Location: KHE125
Instructor: Dr. Gordon Bannerman



W20-53 Museum Madness NEW

Winter is the perfect time for cultural and intellectual exploration. Directed by an art insider and professional tour guide, you’ll visit key exhibitions in museums, public galleries, and cultural enclaves, getting the most out of these encounters in the company of engaged fellow-travellers. Expect guided and impromptu discussions, practical art-appreciation tips, and encounters with movers-and-shakers in art, design and architecture. We’ll be mostly indoors at venues accessible by public transit.

Please note: Participants will be responsible for their own admissions fees and several surcharges for institutional guided tours. Free Museum Admission Passes can be obtained, and some participants will already have memberships at museums which include guest privileges. This is an interactive, hands-on course. Itineraries will be emailed to participants in advance of each session.

Founder of Art InSite tours, Betty Ann Jordan is an arts commentator and cultural tour maven. Trained as an artist, she also gives talks on art appreciation.

Limited to 40 participants

Dates: Jan. 31 – Mar. 20 (8 sessions)
Time: Fridays, 1 - 3 p.m.*
Location:
Participants will be advised of each week’s meeting point by e-mail prior to the session.

Fee: $95
Instructor: Betty Ann Jordan

*Please note beginning and ending times. This course is offered on both Wednesdays and Fridays. Please enroll in one class only.


W20-54 Social Documentary Photography 1900-2020 NEW

This lecture series will examine the history of social documentary photography from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. Highlighting the work of noteworthy photographers in successive decades including Alfred Stieglitz, Dorothea Lange, Margaret Bourke White, and war photographer Robert Capa – many of the most important photographs of the modern age will be shown and discussed. We will look at Lewis Hine’s photographs that helped to alter child labour laws in the United States early in the 20th century and consider images from the Great Depression. Iconic photos that helped to promote the civil rights movement and fuel anti-war sentiments during the Vietnam War will also be discussed. Moving through time, we will examine the personalities, the issues of the times and the role photography has played, and continues to play, in shaping social change and modern history.

This is a lecture class by an expert in the subject with opportunities for discussion.

Andre Laredo has over 40 years’ experience in the photographic industry as a commercial photographer, exhibition art printer and teacher. The son of well-known documentary photographer, Victor Laredo, Andre grew up in the world of photography in New York City. Emigrating to Canada in 1990, Andre founded D-Max Laboratories, the foremost art printing facility in Canada at the time. Andre has a Bachelor of Fine Arts from OCAD University and is currently teaching at Gallery 44. 

Limited to 60 participants

Dates: Jan. 31 – Mar. 20 (8 sessions)
Time: Fridays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m. 
Fee: $95
Location: ILLC - International Room
Instructor: Andre Laredo


W20-55 Wine By Grape: Exploring Wine One Grape at a Time NEW

A rose is a rose is a rose – that might be true for roses, but not for wines. A Merlot from Chile is quite different than one from Ontario, France, California, or even Italy. The same is true for Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Riesling, or Shiraz, which is Australian and Syrah is French – but the same grape. What?  Join our resident wine expert, Michael Pinkus, the Grape Guy, as he compares grape varieties from different regions of the world. All you need is a set of wine glasses, your palate and your opinion.

This is a wine-tasting class offering expert information and sound advice.

Michael Pinkus has a love affair with wine that goes back over 20 years and continues to this day. He is a multi-award-winning journalist, as well as a national and international wine judge, and is a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in numerous national and international magazines. He is also the sole writer for his website MichaelPinkusWineReview.com (formerly OntarioWineReview.com) and was President of the Wine Writers’ Circle of Canada (2000 – 2015).

Limited to 40 participants


Dates: Jan. 31 – Mar. 20 (8 sessions)
Time: Fridays, 2:10 – 3:50 p.m. 
Fee: $139*
Location: VIC103
Instructor: Michael Pinkus

*Cost of course includes $44 non-refundable materials fee.


Accessibility: The LIFE Institute is committed to accessibility for persons with disabilities. Please contact the office 2 weeks in advance of the first class if you have any particular accommodation requirements.